Wire Fraud Statute Virginia

Reckless driving in Virginia is a class 1 misdemeanor. How serious is a class 1 misdemeanor in Virginia. It is serious enough that it can land you jail. Are you really going to jail for a reckless driving ticket in Virginia. The honest answer is that in most instances, no. But it is a possibility if you are not careful. Talk to a reckless driving lawyer in Virginia.

The SRIS Law Group defends clients charged with reckless driving regularly before the different traffic courts in Virginia.

Two of most regularly charged reckless driving offenses in Virginia are reckless driving by speed and reckless driving general.

Please seriously consider calling our firm if you have been charged with reckless driving in Virginia.

We have client meeting locations in Fairfax, Prince William, Richmond, Loudoun & Fredericksburg.

Wire Fraud Statute Virginia

Virginia 46.2-862 Reckless Driving Statute

§ 46.2-862. Exceeding speed limit.

A person shall be guilty of reckless driving who drives a motor vehicle on the highways in the Commonwealth (i) at a speed of twenty miles per hour or more in excess of the applicable maximum speed limit or (ii) in excess of eighty miles per hour regardless of the applicable maximum speed limit.

Virginia 46.2-852 Reckless Driving Statute

§ 46.2-852. Reckless driving; general rule.

Irrespective of the maximum speeds permitted by law, any person who drives a vehicle on any highway recklessly or at a speed or in a manner so as to endanger the life, limb, or property of any person shall be guilty of reckless driving.

Wire Fraud Statute Virginia

Virginia 46.2-865 Reckless Driving Statute

46.2-865. Racing; penalty.

Any person who engages in a race between two or more motor vehicles on the highways in the Commonwealth or on any driveway or premises of a church, school, recreational facility, or business property open to the public in the Commonwealth shall be guilty of reckless driving, unless authorized by the owner of the property or his agent. When any person is convicted of reckless driving under this section, in addition to any other penalties provided by law the driver’s license of such person shall be suspended by the court for a period of not less than six months nor more than two years. In case of conviction the court shall order the surrender of the license to the court where it shall be disposed of in accordance with the provisions of § 46.2-398.

Most people are shocked that if you do donuts in a parking lot, you can be charged with reckless driving in Virginia. If you spin your tires, you can be charged with reckless driving in Virginia. Keep in mind that in Virginia, reckless driving is not a traffic offense. It is a criminal offense. Virginia has some of the strictest driving laws in the entire country. Be very careful about violating the different Virginia driving laws.

Talk to an experienced reckless driving lawyer who has gone before the different county traffic courts and knows how the different county traffic courts rule on reckless driving offenses.

Our Virginia traffic lawyers can and will do their best to help you. We are a simple phone call away.

As an added bonus, the following is a federal statute you might find relevant.

Allocation of assistance.

(1) Set-aside. In providing, and contracting to provide, assistance for capital improvements under this section, in each fiscal year the Secretary shall set aside an amount, as determined by the Secretary, for projects that are eligible for incentives under section 224(b) of the Emergency Low Income Housing Preservation Act of 1987 [former 12 USCS § 1715l note], as such section existed before the date of enactment of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act [enacted Nov. 28, 1990]. The Secretary may make such assistance available on a noncompetitive basis.

(2) General rules for allocation. Except as provided in paragraph (3), with respect to assistance under this section not set aside for projects under paragraph (1), the Secretary–

(A) may award assistance on a noncompetitive basis; and

(B) shall award assistance to eligible projects on the basis of–

(i) the extent to which the project is physically or financially troubled, as evidenced by the comprehensive needs assessment submitted in accordance with title IV of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992; and

(ii) the extent to which such assistance is necessary and reasonable to prevent the default of federally insured mortgages.

(3) Exceptions. The Secretary may make exceptions to selection criteria set forth in paragraph (2)(B) to permit the provision of assistance to eligible projects based upon–

(A) the extent to which such assistance is necessary to prevent the imminent foreclosure or default of a project whose owner has not submitted a comprehensive needs assessment pursuant to title IV of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992;

(B) the extent to which the project presents an imminent threat to the life, health, and safety of project residents; or

(C) such other criteria as the Secretary may specify by regulation or by notice printed in the Federal Register.

(4) Considerations. In providing assistance under this section, the Secretary shall take into consideration–

(A) the extent to which there is evidence that there will be significant opportunities for residents (including a resident council or resident management corporation, as appropriate) to be involved in the management of the project (except that this paragraph shall have no application to projects that are owned as cooperatives); and

(B) the extent to which there is evidence that the project owner has provided competent management and complied with all regulatory and administrative requirements.

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